Events / Mathematical Models for Infectious Disease Transmission Dynamics over Complex Contact Networks

Mathematical Models for Infectious Disease Transmission Dynamics over Complex Contact Networks

May 10, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Chambers Hall, Lower Level, 600 Foster Street, Evanston, IL 60208

Samuel Jenness – Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

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Title:

Mathematical Models for Infectious Disease Transmission Dynamics over Complex Contact Networks: Statistical Methods and Applications for HIV/STI Prevention Science

Abstract:

HIV and STIs are transmitted over highly structured sexual partnership networks that evolve over time. Investigating network-based drivers of epidemics and opportunities for disease prevention that depend on network structure has required the development of statistical approaches to modeling dynamic network structures embedded within broader mathematical models of intra- and inter-host epidemiology, demography, and bio-behavioral disease transmission. In this talk, I present on temporal exponential random graph models (ERGMs) to model dynamic networks using easily collected egocentric network data, the integration of these methods within our epidemic modeling software — EpiModel (www.epimodel.org) — and our recent applications of these tools to investigate empirical and intervention questions for HIV/STI prevention in the United States and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Bio:

Samuel Jenness, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. At Emory, he is the Principal Investigator of the EpiModel Research Lab, where his research focuses on developing the methods and software tools for mathematical modeling of infectious diseases over complex dynamic contact networks, and applying these to investigate HIV and STI transmission dynamics and emerging prevention tools in the United States and globally. Prior to his faculty appointment, he received his PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Washington.

This talk is co-sponsored by both the CONNECT Research Program within the Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing and the Center for Prevention Implementation Methodology (Ce-PIM). CONNECT supports research which elucidates the complex mechanisms driving the health disparities of stigmatized populations, in particular gender and sexual minorities. Ce-PIM seeks to improve the implementation of drug abuse and HIV interventions through the development, application, and dissemination of new system science methodologies.

For more information, please visit the Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems’ website.